Paisley Halloween Festival has been named Best Cultural Event or Festival at the Scottish Thistle Awards 2019/2020 National Final.

Organised by VisitScotland, the prestigious awards celebrate innovation, excellence and success in the Scottish tourism sector.

The popular event in Renfrewshire Council’s annual calendar picked up the National Award for its 2018 festival, which saw crowds of over 34,000 people flock to the town across two days to enjoy a bumper programme of spectacular aerial performances, thrilling live acts and a Mardi-Gras style parade with more than 500 costumed performers.

Inspired by the town’s dark and deathly 17th century witch history, the enhanced theme of ‘Something Wicked this Way Comes’ thrilled visitors from all over Scotland.

Judges were impressed with the seasonality of the event and the growth that it has seen in recent years. They also praised event organisers for their engagement with young people and the community.

The festival was a highlight of VisitScotland’s Year of Young People 2018 celebrations, with young people at the heart of the festival’s development and delivery.

A 20-strong Youth Panel worked alongside Renfrewshire Council’s Events Team to design and deliver the programme, while more than 500 young people took part in a new creative learning programme. This provided young people with the opportunity to participate in all aspects of festival from performance to live event management and technical production.

The Scottish Thistle Awards is based on five regional programmes with the winners of each progressing to the National Final.

Paisley Halloween Festival was among 15 winners in the regional finals for the West in November – which included businesses and individuals from Greater Glasgow & The Clyde Valley, Ayrshire & Arran, Dumfries & Galloway and Argyll & Bute.

The National Final took place at the Edinburgh International Conference Centre last night (March 5), and saw 18 individuals, businesses and events honoured for their contribution to the tourism sector.

Louisa Mahon, Renfrewshire Council’s Head of Communications, Marketing and Events, said: “We are absolutely thrilled that Paisley Halloween Festival has won Best Festival in Scotland at the Scottish Thistle Awards. We were in a category with some of Scotland’s most amazing cultural events and are delighted to be keeping company with them. Well done to everyone.

“Paisley Halloween is one of the most highly anticipated events in our calendar – and is now regarded as one of the biggest and best of its kind in the UK.

“Winning this award continues to put Paisley on the map as a great place to visit and experience world class cultural events – and we look forward to continuing to welcome even more people to Paisley to enjoy.”

VisitScotland Regional Leadership Director Gordon Smith, said: “Congratulations to everyone at Renfrewshire Council on winning the national Scottish Thistle Award for Best Cultural Event or Festival. This is a fantastic achievement for Paisley Halloween Festival which has become one of the most anticipated events in the region’s calendars which has gone from strength to strength in recent years.

“The Scottish Thistle Awards give businesses and individuals working within tourism in Scotland the opportunity to earn the recognition and appreciation they deserve from their own industry peers.

“The impact of tourism goes far beyond the holiday experience. It is vital to the Scottish economy, reaching every corner of the country, creating jobs and bringing economic and social change.”

The Scottish Thistle Award marks another celebration for the Paisley Halloween Festival after it won Best Festival or Outdoor Event at the EventIt E Awards in June 2019.

The Paisley Halloween Festival is organised by Renfrewshire Council and the 2018 event was supported by the Year of Young People 2018 event fund managed by EventScotland, part of VisitScotland’s Events Directorate.

For more information on the Scottish Thistle Awards, visit: https://www.scottishthistleawards.co.uk/

Find out more about Paisley Halloween Festival

We are getting involved in everything from the technical side and working with aerial artists to creating large props and helping with special effects. I am really looking forward to seeing how everything will work together.

Kate McBurnie, 15 years old
Paisley 2018 Halloween Youth Panel

More fantastic events in Renfrewshire this year

PACE Theatre Company has announced actor James McArdle as its first patron. And the announcement comes as the company reveals the location of the building which is to be transformed into a new community theatre space for Paisley.

EXCHANGE will be dedicated to promoting and developing theatre for children, young people and families; as well as promoting participation by young people through performance and creative learning opportunities.

The vacant building on Old Sneddon St in Paisley, was most recently the site of a former nightclub (Mannequins) but was built as the New Templar Hall in 1932 and has been variously used as a dance hall, cinema and telephone exchange in its lifetime.

The building will provide a home venue for PACE’s own performances (almost 200 annually) as well as hosting a programme of professional touring productions, and offering an alternative venue for Renfrewshire’s thriving community performance scene. It’s planned flexible-use spaces will also allow for a host of creative learning opportunities.

James is a former PACE Youth Theatre member and since graduating from RADA in 2010 he has garnered a string of impressive credits including title roles in James I, Platonov and Peter Gynt at the National Theatre, a Broadway transfer of Tony Kushner’s Angels in America, and as the Earl of Moray in the 2019 feature film Mary Queen of Scots.

 

James McArdle on being a patron of PACE

“I’ll always be grateful to PACE for the start that they gave me on my journey to becoming an actor, not just the skills I learnt when acting but how to have confidence in myself and hold my own. It is a privilege to be able support them in their ambitions.

“I have experienced first-hand that theatre has the power to be life-changing and already, it’s clear that through this building they will be able to create even more opportunities for young people and their families.

“It’s still the happiest time of my life, I felt like I had a voice and was listened to at PACE even though I was young. It taught me I had value and worth which has been a vital part in becoming an actor but also just in growing up.”

 

The award-winning Paisley Halloween Festival has scooped another top prize after it was named Best Cultural Event or Festival at the 2019/20 Scottish Thistle Awards West Scotland regional finals.

Organised by VisitScotland, the awards celebrate innovation, excellence and success in the Scottish hospitality and tourism sector.

The popular event in Renfrewshire Council’s annual calendar picked up the award for its 2018 festival, which saw crowds of over 34,000 people flock to the town across two days to enjoy an action-packed programme of spectacular aerial performances, thrilling live acts and a Mardi-Gras style parade with more than 500 costumed performers.

Inspired by the town’s dark and deathly 17th century witch history, the enhanced theme of ‘Something Wicked this Way Comes’ thrilled visitors from all over Scotland.

The festival was also one of the major events as part of VisitScotland’s Year of Young People 2018 celebrations, with young people at the heart of the festival’s development and delivery.

A 20-strong Youth Panel worked alongside Renfrewshire Council’s Events Team to design and deliver the programme, while more than 500 young people took part in a new creative learning programme. This provided young people with the opportunity to participate in all aspects of festival from performance to live event management and technical production.

Paisley Halloween Festival was among 15 winners in the Regional Finals for the West last week – including businesses and individuals from Greater Glasgow & The Clyde Valley, Ayrshire & Arran, Dumfries & Galloway and Argyll & Bute – and will now go on to the prestigious National Final on March 5, 2020.

Louisa Mahon, Renfrewshire Council’s Head of Communications, Marketing and Events, said: “We are delighted that the Paisley Halloween Festival has been recognised alongside the very best of the Scottish tourism industry at the Scottish Thistle Awards West Regional Final.

“The festival continues to grow larger and more creative each year – and is now regarded as one of the biggest and best events of its kind in the UK. It has also helped to raise Paisley’s profile and cement the town’s reputation as a place to come and see world class cultural events.

“We look forward to taking our place alongside all of the outstanding Regional Finals winners at the National Finals in March.”

Gordon Smith, VisitScotland Regional Director, said: “Congratulations to Renfrewshire Council on winning Best Cultural Event or Festival for Paisley Halloween Festival at the Scottish Thistle Awards regional finals. Taking over the streets of Paisley every Halloween, the Festival it has become one of the most hotly anticipated events in the region’s calendar, which this year welcomed record crowds and was supported by EventScotland’s National Events Fund. I wish the team the very best for the national finals in March.

“The Scottish Thistle Awards give businesses and individuals working within tourism in Scotland the opportunity to earn the recognition and appreciation they deserve from their own industry peers. They celebrate those people and businesses throughout the country responsible for offering the warmest of welcomes that Scotland is famous for.”

The Scottish Thistle Award marks a double celebration for the Paisley Halloween Festival after it won Best Festival or Outdoor Event at the EventIt E Awards in June.

The Paisley Halloween Festival is organised by Renfrewshire Council and the 2018 event was supported by the Year of Young People 2018 event fund managed by EventScotland, part of VisitScotland’s Events Directorate.

This year’s festival, which took place on Friday 25 and Saturday 26 October 2019, continued to grow with a Dark Circus theme delivered alongside internationally-acclaimed outdoor theatre specialists, Cirque Bijou, and saw the entire town centre transformed into a thrilling Halloween playground.

For more information on the Scottish Thistle Awards, visit: https://www.scottishthistleawards.co.uk/

Best Cultural Event or Festival Scottish Thistle Awards

Find out more about Paisley Halloween Festival

We are getting involved in everything from the technical side and working with aerial artists to creating large props and helping with special effects. I am really looking forward to seeing how everything will work together.

Kate McBurnie, 15 years old
Paisley 2018 Halloween Youth Panel

Paisley celebrated its biggest ever Halloween Festival as 41,000 people flocked to the town to see the amazing floats, circus performers and spectacular Mardi-Gras style parade.

One of the largest festivals of its kind in the UK, this year’s Dark Circus themed event was delivered alongside internationally-acclaimed outdoor theatre specialists, Cirque Bijou, who helped transform the entire town centre into the perfect Halloween playground.

More than 350 costumed performers and community groups took part in the parade, the centrepiece of the festival, which wound its way through the town centre, led by the sinister Svengali ringmaster.

The parade also featured fantastic, giant lion and elephant floats, ferocious fire performers, creepy clowns and curious creatures, to delight the gathered crowds.

Another spectacle of the festival was the dazzling aerial performances from aerial artists, All or Nothing, who performed their death-defying act ‘Into the Dark’.

The performance saw the artists take to the skies to circle and swirl around a haunted carousel over the grounds of the town’s iconic Abbey.

Crowds were entertained with top-class live performances from the likes of Spark LED Drummers, Mr Wilson’s Second Liners and Big Grey on the Circus Stage.

A funfair and cinema screening of popular Halloween films added to the packed programme, while families enjoyed workshops including pumpkin carving and costume making workshops.

The Silent Disco also proved a welcome addition to the festival offering plenty of dancing, singing and Halloween fun for all the family.

Amanda Clarke from Motherwell, said: “This is our first time to the event, we saw it online and wanted to come along. It’s been a great day out with the kids. We’ll definitely be back next year.”

Kirsty Cameron from Paisley said: “It’s really well put together, I bring the family most years and it’s always very good with lots going on.”

The Paisley Halloween Festival, which was supported in 2018 through the Year of Young People event fund, was awarded £16,950 of National Programme funding from EventScotland for this year’s event.

More fun to come!

Award-winning photographer Gary Chittick will be regularly sharing his spectacular pictures with you on his Paisley.is blog.

Gary marks the start of springtime by showing off some of his favourite images captured in Renfrewshire at this time of year.

March is the month of the Vernal/ Spring Equinox when the equator is the closest point of Earth to the sun.

It is also the month of the Equilux when day and night are of equal lengths. This is quickly followed by the start of British Summer Time on Sunday 31 March, unfortunately meaning an hour less in bed. Booooo!

I thought I’d share a few images from Renfrewshire from this time of year. I hope you enjoy them.

Clyde Muirshiel Regional Park

Clyde Muirshiel in spring by Gary Chittick

The change from winter to spring is a good time to explore local gem, Clyde Muirshiel Regional Park in Lochwinnoch. There are a number of great walks around the park, including a popular local hike up Windy Hill. I have spent a great deal of time walking around the park at all times of the day and night (not for the feint hearted or those scared of unusual noises in the dark!) and the longer days make the park more accessible for those looking to stretch their legs in daylight after work.

This image was taken on the walk up to Windy Hill with the changing colours and low cloud making for a moody scene. I’m looking forward to taking a lot more images here this year.

Paisley Sunsets

Paisley skyline by Gary Chittick

Paisley certainly has an amazing skyline for sunsets and March into April has the sun in a good position over the horizon (depending on your viewpoint) for sunset images. Seeing a colourful sunset is often a a mix of luck, timing and a little help from mother nature but it’s the sort of event to sit, watch and enjoy. You can really admire the unique skyline from all around the town and Paisley has some great viewpoints for sunset, including Saucel Hill, Barshaw Park and here, Barshaw Golf Course. Here’s hoping for many more.

A Wee Calf

Who can resist a cute baby, whether human or animal? The change from winter into spring obviously means that the thoughts of many of Renfrewshire’s resident wildlife turns to creating new life. The next few weeks and months will see a range of baby animals join our world. Whilst this is a time to be extra careful around animals with young – especially if you have a pet of your own – it is also a time to enjoy the sights and sounds this new life gives us.

For this image, a young calf and it’s siblings enjoy some spring sunshine up near Hartfield Farm on the Glennifer Braes.

Renfrewshire Aurora

Renfrewshire Aurora by Gary Chittick

The equinoxes (Spring and Autumn) have typically resulted in an increased chance of aurora. NASA’s research suggests that this is because of the Earth’s “tilt” towards the sun at these times of year which makes it easier for our magnetic field to connect with the charged particles in the solar wind. As you may have seen with some of my previous images, I’ve observed the aurora many times from Renfrewshire and there is always an extra hope at this time of year for increased activity.

To show you what a “good” aurora can look like from the area, here is one from Lochwinnoch. Remember that the camera enhances what you can see by eye and most people see the aurora as a greyish, greenish glow, until you have movement which is much easier to see. The moral here is, if the aurora is on your bucket list, it IS possible to see it from Renfrewshire!

Remember that the Spring Equinox traditionally marks a time for new beginnings, birth and fresh starts, so be positive and get out there and find something fresh and exciting to do in Renfrewshire!

Gary’s pictures are not available for use without his permission.

Find out more about Gary

I love the fabulous architecture - Paisley Abbey, Coats Memorial and the town hall, all within walking distance.

Barbara Erskine
What's Our Story?

Day visits to Renfrewshire almost doubled between 2015 and 2017, new figures have revealed.

The sharp rise was unveiled in the first annual update of the Renfrewshire Visitor Plan 2018-2021, which aims to develop the area as one of Scotland’s key tourist destinations.

It showed that day visits to Renfrewshire rose from 2.73 million between 2013-2015 to 5.33 million between 2015-2017 – with the area’s thriving events calendar proving popular with visitors.

There was also an increase in day and overnight visitor spend from £72.5 million to £99.1 million during the same period.

The first update of the Renfrewshire Visitor Plan – which was shown before Renfrewshire Council’s Leadership Board – includes the following key achievements:

– visitor numbers to Renfrewshire’s events are expected to exceed growth of 8% in 2018 – surpassing the target of 4% year-on-year;

– The delivery of 15 events, including four major visitor events in 2017 – Paisley Food and Drink Festival, the British Pipe Band Championships, The Spree Festival and Paisley Halloween Festival – all of which witnessed increased attendee numbers;

– the launch of Paisley Welcomes, a new customer service excellence and product familiarisation training programme to enhance the visitor experience in Renfrewshire;

– increased support for tourism business growth with 53 businesses supported and 34 businesses and agencies now regularly engaged in a tourism business network.

This year also saw the development and launch of a new destination brand and the area’s first ever digital guide to Paisley and Renfrewshire – www.Paisley.is.

The website promotes Paisley and Renfrewshire as a place to live work and visit and offers a guide to what’s on across the region, with dedicated content for each town, village and attraction.

Renfrewshire Council Leader Iain Nicolson said: “It’s fantastic to see such positive results in the first annual report of the Renfrewshire Visitor Plan as we continue to work towards transforming tourism in the area.

Gordon Smith, VisitScotland Regional Director, said: “This incredible increase in day visits and spend in Renfrewshire is testament to the brilliant work being done to boost the area’s tourism and events offering.

“Tourism is more than a holiday experience – it is the heartbeat of the Scottish economy and touches every community, generating income, jobs and social change.  VisitScotland is committed to encouraging and supporting the industry to provide world class service, facilities, events and attractions to keep up with ever-changing consumer demands and it is clear that Renfrewshire is making huge strides to ensure visitors continue to have memorable experiences in the region.”

It will be fantastic to see young people getting hands-on experience and participating in the design and delivery of a fun event within their local community.

Paul Bush OBE
VisitScotland Director of Events

Almost 30 projects have been supported in 2018 through Renfrewshire’s Culture, Heritage and Events Fund – including a two-day music festival, a mini Mela and jewellery making classes.

The fund was launched in February 2016 to support Paisley’s bid to be UK City of Culture in 2021 and has continued as part of a wider plan to use culture and heritage to transform the area’s future, supporting 27 projects in 2018 alone.

It aims to create more chances for people to get involved in cultural activity, help young people develop, boost the local economy, raise Renfrewshire’s profile, and show how creativity can boost education, social inclusion and quality of life.

Three rounds of the Culture, Heritage and Events Fund have been completed in 2018, with a fourth round closing for applications in early December.

Local groups and organisations supported in 2018 include The STAR Project, Paisley YMCA, Right2Dance, Media Monty, Johnstone Band, Paisley Opera and Renfrewshire Carers Centre.

Since 2016, almost 300 applications have been received to the Culture, Heritage and Events Fund from communities, businesses and cultural organisations in Renfrewshire and across Scotland – with a total funding request of £3,422,984. Over a third of these have been supported, with a total of £886,544 spent.

Successful completed projects to date include teenage animator Morgan Spence’s Lego stop-motion animation about Paisley – now seen by millions – and local dance group Right2Dance bringing Sir Matthew Bourne’s Re:Bourne company here for a week-long residency.

The CHE Fund is part of a wider cultural regeneration plan for Paisley which also includes a £100m investment in town centre venues, including the £42m project to turn Paisley Museum in to an international-class destination based around the town’s unique heritage and collections.

Drew Moir, who was awarded funding to host the 2018 Paisley International Tango Festival, said: “The Paisley Tango scene would not exist without support from the Culture, Heritage and Events Fund. We now get approached by two or three professionals a month who want to be invited to perform here, a testament to the quality of the event and the friendly environment our town can create.“

This year, Renfrewshire Council have also launched a new fund, designed to support Renfrewshire’s cultural sector. The Cultural Organisations Development Fund is open to cultural and creative organisations across Renfrewshire and will complement the Culture, Heritage and Events Fund, providing support to build the resilience and sustainability of local organisations, helping them realise their cultural ambitions.

The results of the current round of funding are due to be announced in February, with further funding rounds to be announced for 2019 in the new year.

For more information on Renfrewshire’s cultural grants, visit www.renfrewshire.gov.uk/culturalgrants

The area punches above its weight in providing leading artists and cultural icons.

Anthony Jenkins
What's Our Story?

Paisley’s iconic Town Hall has now officially closed its doors so that it can undergo a £22million internal refurbishment, reopening again in 2022.

The town hall has been the social heart of Paisley since opening in 1882, hosting countless meetings, tea dances, social gatherings, conferences, events, festivals and concerts.

The historic venue gave Paolo Nutini his big break, hosted some of Gerry Rafferty’s earliest shows and provided the setting for Cuttin’ A Rug, John Byrne’s follow-up to The Slab Boys.

Construction on the historic building, which was originally designed by Belfast architect W H Lynn, began in 1879 after George A. Clark, a member of Paisley’s famous thread family, left £20,000 for its creation in his will. A statue commemorating Clark and his contribution to Paisley now stands outside the famous venue.

The £22 million refurbishment will transform the facility, creating a social hub, conference and events venue fit for the 21st century.

Here at Paisley.is, our fondest memories of the town hall have always been as a proud host to our many events. In the last 12 months alone, Paisley Town Hall has hosted Motown legends Martha Reeves and the Vandellas, hundreds of young witches and ghouls, a world-class selection of ales as well as Santa Claus himself.

We’re already looking forward to seeing the building’s transformation when it reopens in 2021. Until then, take a look through the picture gallery at the top packed with our favourite town hall moments.

 

You may have seen the hit Netflix show Outlaw King telling the story of Robert the Bruce – but did you know Paisley’s medieval Abbey has links to King of Scots and a rich royal heritage?

The Abbey dates back to the 12th century and is recognised as the ‘Cradle of the Royal House of Stewart’ due to its ties to the family.

Paisley Abbey was founded when Walter Fitzalan, the High Steward of Scotland – whose descendants became the House of Stewart/Stuart – signed a charter for the priory to be set up in land he owned in Paisley in 1163.

Set up on the site of an old Celtic church by 13 monks, the priory was raised to the status of an Abbey in 1245. The Abbey was dedicated to four saints; St. Mary, St. James, St. Milburga and St. Mirin, who brought Christianity to the church site in the 6th century.

The Abbey would go on to be wealthy and influential under royal patronage, with extensive trade between the Paisley location and commercial centres in Europe. Paisley Abbey would also become a centre for learning. Sir William Wallace, who was a key figure in the Wars of Scottish Independence in the 13th century, is believed to have been educated by the monks of Paisley Abbey.

Much of the original building was burned down in 1307, but it was rebuilt later in the 14th century.

In 1315, Walter Stewart, the 6th High Steward of Scotland, married Marjory Bruce, the daughter of the famous Scottish king Robert the Bruce. The following year, a heavily pregnant Marjory fell while out horse riding near Paisley Abbey. She was taken to the Abbey infirmary where she tragically died, but her unborn child was saved after a caesarean delivery. The child would become King Robert II of Scotland, the first of the Stewart monarchs. This led the Abbey to claim itself as the ‘cradle of the Royal House of Stewart.’

The Stewarts – one of the most enduring royal dynasties in Scottish history – began with Robert II taking the throne as King of Scots in 1371. The Abbey is also the final resting place of six High Stewards of Scotland, Princess Marjory Bruce, the wives of King Robert II and King Robert III.

In 2016, Paisley celebrated its royal connections as the Abbey marked the 700th anniversary as the birthplace of the first Stewart king. A special medieval fayre turned the clocks back to 1316, with the surrounding Abbey Close transformed into a medieval campsite for the day. Visitors could enjoy a working kitchen, hog roast, stocks, custom-made weaponry displays and falconry shows.

You can explore the history of Paisley Abbey for yourself, along with its Gift Shop and Coffee Shop, every Monday to Saturday from 10am to 3pm. Services take place every Sunday at 11am, 12:15pm and 4pm on Sundays, while a host of fabulous events are held at the Abbey throughout the year.

Take a closer look and discover more about particular parts of the Abbey here.

Paisley has a wonderful historic heritage from the medieval until very recently, and is simply one of Scotland's most important places.

Professor Gerard Carruthers
Professor of Scottish Literature
University of Glasgow

Get your boots on and take a stroll round Paisley town centre

We all love a random fact, don’t we? So, let’s take a look at some quirky things about Paisley which you may, or may not, have already known…

Paisley is home to a rich heritage and a vast range of striking architecture which makes for a fascinating story around every corner of the town.

You might be familiar with the town’s famous names, such as Paolo Nutini, Gerrard Butler, David Tennant, John Byrne or Pam Hogg – but did you know that the town is the birthplace of a number of ground-breaking inventions? Or that you can even see an Alien at Paisley Abbey?

Find out all about these fun facts and more below…

Architecture galore

Paisley Abbey and Town Hall

Did you know that Paisley town centre has 110 listed buildings? That’s a higher concentration than anywhere in Scotland outside of Edinburgh. It’s definitely worth paying a visit to the historic Paisley Abbey, the Anchor Mill and many more!

An alien gargoyle

Speaking of Paisley Abbey, have you seen the alien gargoyle among the intricate statues outside the striking building? The design is believed to have been carved by a rogue sci-fi loving stonemason in the early 1990s in ode to the 1979 cult film.

The threads that bind us

Close up of an old spool of thread

Did you know that at one point a Paisley-based company was responsible for making 90 per cent of the world’s sewing thread? Paisley’s thread exports and patterned shawls saw the town establish itself as a global manufacturing and textile powerhouse through local business J&P Coats Ltd.

All aboard!

To many people’s surprise, Paisley Gilmour Street is actually the fourth-busiest station in Scotland with more than five million passengers per year. This is more than Haymarket in Edinburgh, Aberdeen or Dundee!

Bringing whisky to the world

Did you know around 30 per cent of the world’s Scotch is bottled in Renfrewshire? World-famous drinks manufacturer Diageo’s packaging plant at Shieldhall bottles more than 25 million cases of Scotch whisky annually.

Fancy a game?

Did you know the world’s first commercial five-a-side football pitch centre opened in Paisley? Keith Rogers opened the pitches at the town’s Anchor recreational centre in 1987 under the name Pitz.

First European trophy

It’d be rude to talk about football in Paisley without mentioning St Mirren – so, did you know that the Buddies were the first Scottish team to win a European trophy? In 1922, St Mirren were invited to play in a tournament to mark the opening of Barcelona’s new stadium, Les Corts. The Buddies won it and brought home the Barcelona Cup.

Substitute me for him

While he may be remembered mostly for THAT goal against Holland at the 1978 World Cup (see video above), Archie Gemmill was also famous for being the first official substitute in Scottish domestic football. Gemmill replaced St Mirren’s Jim Clunie in a League Cup tie against Clyde at Shawfield on August 13, 1966 – the first time new substituting rules for competitive games was in operation.

CHIP and PIN

You might use it almost every day, but did you know the CHIP and PIN system was invented by a Paisley Buddie? James Goodfellow OBE created the first Personal Identification Number (PIN) and Automatic Teller Machine (ATM) technology in 1966.

Paisley punks

The Bungalow Musical

For a time The Bungalow Bar on Renfrew Road was the main punk venue in the Glasgow area as punk bands were once banned in Glasgow. Top acts to play the venue included: The Rezillos, The Skids, The Clash, The Jam, Orange Juice, Echo and the Bunnymen and Souxsie and the Banshees.

Get your boots on and take a stroll round Paisley town centre

I love Paisley because you must have the only Abbey worldwide with an ’Alien’ gargoyle! #WhyILovePaisley

@JPBreslin
What's Our Story?